Category Archives: Renaissance

A Sumatran Outing 

Like many readers over the years my miniatures collection has grown to the point that I have trouble finding time for games involving the various armies in my collection. That’s despite not having that many armies. Sometimes this of because of changing trends, but at other times there just is only so much time. As a result collections just don’t get out of the box.

I’m fortunate that I get to play a range of periods and rules, but it was with some enthusiasm that last night my Sumatran army, from the 17th Century, had an outing after a period of time hiding in their boxes. The resulting game, using DBR, was extremely enjoyable for both players. Interesting armies, unusual troop types and the vagaries of the dice added much to the game and resulted in an excellent evening of gaming.

The Sumatrans are an unusual army, comprised mostly of charging foot with support from archers, skirmishers and a few elephants. Their opponents on this occasion were Ottoman Turks, who themselves are an eclectic lot and comprise mounted of variable quality, a significant artillery train and foot with, shall we say, a range of capabilities. A few photos of the game can be found on my Renaissance blog here.

Lutzen 1632 – A Short Documentary  

As many readers will know I have more than a passing interest in Renaissance warfare, especially that of the 17th Century. As such I found a recent documentary posted to YouTube rather interesting and thought others may as well.

The short 30 minute documentary looks briefly at the Thirty Years War, and specifically the battle of Lutzen. It provides a mix of modern re-assessment of the Thirty Years War and Sweden’s role, battlefield archaeology, archival research and forensic investigation. This is assembled well without being dumbed down too much. In addition it provides as an interpretation of events in the central sector of the battlefield.

I trust you find it of interest.

English Civil War Scenarios – A Short Review

Well over a year ago I wrote a short review of an English Civil War Gaming Scenarios book a friend from Timaru was kind enough to lend me. This volume was the first in a series which I purchased, but until recently had not reviewed. IMG_0024.JPG Yesterday I took the time to write further short reviews of the subsequent volumes. They can be found in the Renaissance section of this site.

The second volume is probably the best with an interesting mix of battles of various sizes. Though volume three maintains a close second place there are two scenarios which I can’t see as playable with the rules I use. As a result these hat for detract a little from what is otherwise a very good selection of battles. Of course they may be ideal for people using other rule systems.

The final volume I have is volume four, which again has a couple of scenarios which I will not be able to utilise. That said, this volume does have several which are excellent, with Benburb and Inverlochy being classics and cry out for play on the wargames table.

If you have an interest in English Civil War gaming you may find these books useful. Now I just need to organise some games…

Arquebusier 34/3

It seems November was the month for wargaming and military history journals, as in addition to Slingshot my copy of Arquebusier recently arrived. Arquebusier being the journal of the Pike & Shot Society.

With a much smaller membership the Pike & Shot Society Journal is also more limited, comprising around 48 A5 pages per issue. This of course means there are fewer articles. However, as in previous editions it retains its academic flavour and as such it will find favour more with the student than the casual wargamer.

The current edition comprised what looks to be the start of a series entitled “A Study of Orders of Battle from the Age of Louis XIV”, by Iain Stanford. The first article being a review of British Regiments at the Battle of the Dunes (1658). An interesting introduction soon develops allowing the author to review details on the various regiments, both from the New Model, but also those of the Royalists who fought in the campaign and battle. Comprising just over 20 pages it is clearly the centre piece of this issue. As well as placing the orders of battle in a campaign context there are some particularly interesting gems in this article for those interested in the British Civil Wars. A very interesting article.

The second article is that by Stephen Ede-Borrett where he reviews the regiments of Turenne during the Thirty Years War and Franco-Spanis War. While the third main article is part two of a price on Muscovite Select Soldier Regiments, translated from Russian. Both interesting but heavy and outside my area. A short review of the rules Maurice is provided before the useful book reviews section that completes the edition. This time however these book reviews have more warnings to perspective purchases, than recommendations which is not a bad thing!

So another solid issue ideal for the student of the period and one which may well encourage me to break out my own New Model army for service on the table. They having been on garrison duty for too long…

Cancon 2014 – Reflections

Finally I have managed to find some time to pen a few passing thoughts on Cancon 2014. Late I know, but a holiday and then a busy time on our return has a way of limiting time in front of the computer.

As with previous years Cancon was an excellent wargames convention, I am very pleased to have attended in what is now my seventh convention across the ditch. As always it is a great opportunity to catch-up with friends, either playing DBR or playing in other events. As is normal with Cancon there was a large selection of trade stands, some of which I visited. However, such visits reduced my ability to visit other gaming areas and demonstartion games. As a result the photos below are, this year, of the Renaissance DBR competition area rather than other games.

Firstly, we have Brian Sowman, on the left, and Peter Gillard fighting it out on the morning of the second day. In the background can be seen other Renaissance games in progress as well as DBMM and DBA gaming areas. To the left, but not shown, could be found a 25mm Napleonic competition which used a modifeied version of the old WRG rules.

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Next a couple of photos of a another Renaissance game this time between Roger Mackay’s Dutch Rebellion army and Lyle Daymond’s Russian Traditional (1631) army. Of general  interest is the view of another portion of the convention area in the background. Cancon is a large convention and the tables keep flowing to the right with trade satnds to the left. Near right is the FOG Renaissance area.

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Below, another view of the previous game, this time illustrating these two well presented armies in more detail. The Russians are on the right.

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Now, for those interested in reading more on the subject I have just put on-line a summary of my own games in the Renaissance DBR competition. The report can be found here.